Should You Join AARP?

This article was originally posted in February 2014. It is still one of the most read posts on my blog, so with a little editing, I’m reposting it today.

During the last year I’ve read a few articles posted on other retirement blogs and in magazines asking this same question. Should you join AARP? All of the articles, like most information about retirement, focus on the financial aspects of becoming an AARP member. In other words, are the discounts on travel accommodations, insurance and restaurants worth the $12 per year membership fee? Every article ends up saying for the most part you can get the discounts anyway just by virtue of your age as many companies give senior discounts starting at age 55 or 60. So, instead of flashing your AARP membership card, simply flash your driver license with birth date and you receive the discount without spending an additional $12 a year to obtain it. If you’re looking at AARP strictly for discounts, this is probably true, unless you’re in the 50-54 age range, in which case, joining AARP at 50 may get you some discounts you won’t otherwise receive. But, I didn’t join AARP for the discounts. And, I think there’s a financial aspect being overlooked in these articles.

When Ethel Percy Andrus founded the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) in 1958, I was only knee high to a grasshopper, just learning how to spell in Miss Niles’ first grade class. Spelling ‘retirement’ wasn’t even on my radar much less what it meant. For Andrus, however, it meant taking up the cause of aging persons seeking dignity, quality of life and, yes, health insurance.

In 1958 she saw a need to expand the organization she founded in 1947 for retired teachers seeking health insurance. At a time when health insurance was pretty much non-existent for older Americans, Andrus approached many insurance companies looking for one that would insure retirees. While many view AARP as started by insurance companies to sell insurance, I beg to differ.   As Andrus lobbied insurance companies to cover retirees, I believe AARP started out as and still is, a lobbying organization for older people — retirees, seniors, persons of independent means. Whatever you want to call us.

AARP is a voice for us in Washington and even some other parts of the world. Spending $23 million a year on lobbying efforts and with nearly 40 million members, it is one of the largest lobbying organizations in the United States. AARP makes American seniors a powerhouse to be reckoned with and listened to. Having graduated from Miss Niles’ first grade class to baby boomer rabble-rouser, making my voice heard in Washington, even as I age, is the main reason I shell out $12 per year to be a member of what is now officially only known by the acronym AARP.

Yes, I like the discounts I use from time to time. I like the magazine and newsletter I receive. And, since I’m also on the information highway, I like receiving financial, health and lifestyle newsletters in my email inbox. I particularly like their advice on movies made for adults (get your mind out of the gutter…they’re referring to intelligence and maturity). How else will I know which flicks are trending now and worth watching? Yes, I could trawl the web, Google this or that, and probably come up with the same info. But, being a little on the lazy side, I’m willing to shell out the $12 for someone else to do it for me. And, included in this bargain is a membership for your spouse, no additional charge. But, the biggie…a gargantuan lobby.

While some believe AARP’s agenda is too liberal with its focus on hunger, income, housing, health insurance and isolation, the organization certainly keeps the needs of older people in the minds of our politicians. With today’s political agenda of budget cutting and wish to eliminate items like Social Security and Medicare or at least drastically alter these programs, there could not be a more relevant reason for joining AARP.

And, with the money and sheer numbers, it’s enough to make any aspiring politico think about what could happen in the voting booth. With a family history of longevity on my side, I figure I have about 30 years left on this planet. And, being part of a generation who is used to having its way in the world, I have no intention of leaving my voice behind with the workplace. So, when I read about the financial ups and downs of paying out $12 a year, that’s $1 a month, I think there’s a financial component not being addressed. Just think if there was no AARP. Do you think our friends in Washington would hesitate to rip Social Security and Medicare to shreds? I don’t know the answer to that. But, I do know I’m not willing to chance it, not for $12 a year.

For more information about joining AARP, go to http://www.AARP.org.

11 comments on “Should You Join AARP?

  1. Well said Kathy. Unfortunately I know many younger people in this demographic who shudder at the thought of joining a group designated for ‘seniors’. Ageism runs rampant in our society’s mindset.

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    • Yes it does. We start aging from the moment we are born yet anyone over 50 is considered to be aging in our society’s mindset. It just doesn’t make sense to me, but it’s mindset. Changing that attitude is going to be tough, but I believe it can be done…consciousness raising. K

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  2. @Kathy, AARP is basically a luxury for me. I pay $17.00 US Funds because I’m a resident of Canada. Why then am I buying an International AARP membership. It’s not about the discounts because I don’t get any. I joined because AARP changed it’s name from Retired Persons to Real Possibilities. I’m in it for the ‘advocacy benefits’ not for the product & services benefits. And yes, I’m also a member of CARP (Canadian Association of Retired Persons).

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  3. I believe AARP still keeps older Americans on the minds of politicians. In fact, I wouldn’t be surprised if my PA Republican congressman voted “no” on the latest health care bill from the House, in large part due to senior concerns, as well as Medicaid. In addition I really like the magazine and newsletters AARP sends to us….very informative for retirees, just like your blog! Joy

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  4. $1 per month is a drop in t he bucket. I have learned so much on medical issues, drugs, travel–I could go on and on. I don’t read all of the financial stuff just enough to be informed.I have belonged for about 15+ years and have had no regrets at all.

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  5. Hi Kathy, I am thankful for AARP. I read few magazines I find their newsletter and magazine informative and relevant. I hope their lobbying efforts succeed and plan to continue as a member. Thanks for your interesting article!

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  6. I have received lots of helpful information thru the AARP newsletters–medical, travel, social, etc., etc. I have used AARP for numerous discounts around the county and at home. For $16 per year, I won’t give up my membership. They also have Movies for adults in my town, as well as tax help, and other events.

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